PREDATOR/PREY RELATIONSHIPS

At the March 2017 monthly membership meeting, we heard a very information presentation from David Choate.  Dave Choate is a wildlife ecologist and for the past 25 years has primarily investigated cougar-prey ecology in a variety of environments.  His research focuses on the behavioral mechanisms that influence predator-prey population dynamics, how these dynamics structure communities, and bringing this understanding to bear on conservation issues.  He is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he continues his collaboration with the USGS Western Ecological Research Center.  

Below are links to some of the information referenced during his presentation:

Spatial Response to Climate by Predators and Prey in the Intermountain West

Predator & Prey Movement – DNWR (Animations)


THE BANE OF THE BIGHORN:

Sheep and a Deadly Bacteria

Dear Members,

I was very impressed with this article and thought I would pass along the link to The Struggle of the Bighorn by Nate Hegyi, posted on Oct. 23, 2016 for you for your information.  It is a good explanation of the challenges we face constantly with the risk of contact issue.

http://undark.org/article/bighorn-sheep-bacteria-disease/

Thank you,

Brett K. Jefferson

President, Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn 


 DESERT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Click the links below to learn more about the issues surrounding the Desert National Wildlife Refuge:

Review-Journal – Air Force Proposal to Expand

Review-Journal – Questions Abound for Air Force Expansion

Nevada Public Radio – By Air and Land

 

Dear Members,

As many wild sheep conservationists know, the Desert National Wildlife Refuge (DNWR) is the hub of desert bighorns in Southern Nevada.  Its location is also strategically important for military training.

 Over half the area of the DNWR is designated as part of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which means that the readiness mission must be coordinated with the conservation mission carried out by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).  That mission – which was and is the primary reason for the refuge – is to perpetuate desert bighorn sheep and its habitat.

The Air Force now proposes to expand the readiness mission to approximately 75% of the entire Refuge, and you have the opportunity to comment on this proposal this Fall.  Important points must be considered from the standpoints of conservation and military readiness.

 The Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn is commenting in writing, appearing at the public forums, and engaging in direct discussions with the Air Force, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nevada congressional delegation.  We offer the attached information for your study and use as you join us in what needs to be a rigorous and searching debate about the future of the DNWR, NTTR, and the desert bighorns that compose the main strength of the species in Southern Nevada. 

As always, the Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn and our Southern Nevada Desert Bighorn Sheep thank you and appreciate your support. 

Sincerely,

Brett K. Jefferson

President, Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn

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BIGHORN SHEEP

DESERT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Click the pictures below to access reports about the Desert National Wildlife Refuge.

USGS_DNWR_BHS_Assessment

 

DNWR_MountainLion


DISEASE

Click the links below to learn more about disease issues:

Review-Journal Article – Pneumonia

Review-Journal Article – Disease Outbreak

Arizona Sonora News Article – Disease

 

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POPULATION DISTRIBUTION

1860 1960 2014